Past Botanical Links of the Day for: November 18

Past Botanical Links of the Day for: November 18


November 18, 1996 - Royal Tasmanian Botanical Garden
Among the most extreme cases of ecological calamity are those in which introduced plants or animals are brought into an environment in which there are no natural enemies. This site documents an opposite problem where the pest is native only to Australia (endemic). The oldest living trees in the Royal Tasmainian Botanical Garden are English species planted in 1828 as reminders of 'home' -- now the largest public collection of exotic conifers in the southern hemisphere -- are under attack by the fungal pest, Armillaria luteobubefina. Hopefully, this international appeal will raise enough money to help begin to address their serious problem.(***)
November 18, 1997 - The Learning Web
Dedicated to K-12 education and lifelong learning, there are many nifty products in this corner of the USGS web which excels as well in its layout and graphic presentation. Pages of the online booklets are clean and easy to read with just enough decoration to stave away internet ho-hum- for example see the booklet Fossils, Rocks, and Time under "educational materials" in the Adventures section, or Volcanoes by Robert I. Tilling, in the Living section. Find out who uses the most water for what in the U.S. and what acid rain is doing to the face of the nation's capital. Those who'd like to learn the interpretation of color-infrared photographs and false-color composites, or who'd just like to take an electronic field trip to Glacier Mountain will not be disappointed. Indeed it would be difficult to not come away with a handful of at least several maps and fact sheets from this site by the United States Geological Survey, maintained by Maura Hogan et al., Reston, Virginia. (****) -LF
November 18, 1998 - Topical Reviews in Plant Physiology
This is a list of references from major plant physiology journals on topics in current plant physiology, 1992-97. Many are collected from the Annual Reviews collections, Photosynthesis Research, Plant Physiology, and Trends in Plant Science. These are searchable by your web browser's find option (ctrl-F on PC and Apple-F on Macs). Collected by Bob Wise, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI. (***) SR [Note: I present this in full knowledge that in 2-3 yrs metadatabases will be formed that merge similar data from over 100 major journals upon user request.]
November 18, 1999 - Botany in the Library of Congress Vatican Exhibit
Renaissance botany was highly concerned with illustration and compilation of herbals, and the Vatican Library is a repository for many of the works one hears so much about. Available now in perpetuity on the world wide web, in what the authors call a "hypermedia interface" to The Library of Congress Vatican Exhibit of 1993, is an exhibit of objects (herbals) and descriptions of the works of Pliny, Theophrastus, Galen et al. Also covered are works in medicine and biology- overall quite a useful who's who of old writers. Site by Frans van Hoesel with Marc Andreessen, University of Illinois, Urbana.(****)LF
November 18, 2002 - Biological Biochemical Image Database (BBID)
The BBID is a fairly advanced educational / research resource. The site, driven by a searchable database of images from the published literature, illustrates putative biological pathways, macromolecular structures, gene families, and cellular relationships. These images form working models that could prove useful in discussions of, for instance, model genomic approaches to functional biology. Gene names, pathways, cell/tissue types and disease names are listed. Most of these correspond to animal models, but some may prove useful to understanding plants. (***)
November 18, 2003 - USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map
I was surprised to find that I had never featured the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map after all of these years. The hardiness map refers to temperature and moisture trends that limit plant distributions. The map can be used to predict whether a particular plant will tolerate conditions at various locations; it can also be used to predict special measures that may be needed to protect them as well. This hyperlinked version is provided by the National Arboretum of the US and provides links to each state. (***1/2) -S
November 18, 2005 - Southern Wetland Flora
Southern Wetland Flora is a web version of a booklet produced by the USDA Soil Conservation Service, South National Technical Center in Fort Worth, Texas in 1999 (or so) and updated since then online. The guide provides color images, drawings, distribution maps and plant descriptions for each of 300 species. There is also a key to groups, which are a bit eclectic, and a nice illustrated glossary. Ironically, this is archived at the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center in South Dakota. (***1/2) -SR