Scott's Botanical Links--February 1999

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Home Page

Past links:

February 26, 1999 - Botanic Descriptions of Leaf Shapes Quiz - gone? (9/11/00)
The sole purpose of this site is to learn the different leaf shapes used as taxonomic terms by botanists. Overall leaf shape, basal leaf shape, apical leaf shape and leaf margins all are quizzed here. A nice taxonomic reference site for beginners. Site by David Chipping of California Native Plant Society, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, CA. (***1/2) -SR
February 25, 1999 - National Center for Biotechnology Information
The NCBI is home to a number of essential research sites/databases for molecular biology, including BLAST, Entrez, Genbank, PubMed, taxonomy database and a structure (modeling) site. Entrez is a good place to start to find out what is known about a particular nucleotide sequence, protein or genome. BLAST provides sequence matching with available databases, which includes Genbank. PubMed is the home to National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE. Access to this is free. This is a good starting site for processing data and looking at how genomic information is processed. Site by NLM at NIH. (****) -SR
February 24, 1999 - Medical Botany - A Mini-Course
This mini-course on a USDA server covers the botanical aspects of ethnobotany and the search for medicinally active phytochemicals. Pages include an introduction to botany, phytochemicals, formulations, aromathematic, an Herbalists' Desk Reference, and dangerous herbs. There are also ethnobotanical pages on American and Amerindian, Amazonian, African, Arabic, Ayurvedic, Biblical, Chinese, Hawaiian and European plants. Essentially unillustrated, but there is useful information here. Site by James A. Duke, The Herbal Village, Fulton, Maryland. (***1/2) -SR
February 23, 1999 - ExPASy Proteomics Tools
This molecular biology research site currently has 16 unique databases for protein structure and analysis, with links to the major nucleotide-level genomic databases. Although this is not an "educational resource" per se, a visit to this site can be very instructive in demonstrating how "real" molecular biologists use nucleotide data to understand protein structure. Site by the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), Geneva, Switzerland. (****) -SR
February 22, 1999 - Adobe Acrobat Reader
Portable Document Format or PDF is the current de facto standard for producing print-perfect copies of documents. These documents are found at many sites, from popular journal sites (for reprints) to the IRS (for obscure tax forms). To view and/or print these documents, you need to get a copy of the Acrobat Reader at Adobe's site. The writer is not free, but is discounted heavily for academic users; however, the Acrobat Reader IS FREE. If you already have a copy, you may wish to visit the site again, as Acrobat 4.0 will be released on March 1! Site by Adobe. (****-an essential resource) -SR
February 19, 1999 - Biology of Horticulture
This site has pictures, questions, and labs related to the biological processes and functions of plants: Diversity, Structure, Physiology, Environment. The "Question and Answer" section provides concise answers to selected class questions. The lab exercises are not illustrated, but may be a start in making a set of materials from scratch. Part of the "Plant Dictionary" website by the Department of Horticulture & Crop Science at The Ohio State University. (***1/2) -SR
February 18, 1999 - Technology of Horticulture
This site has pictures, questions, and labs related to the mechanisms and procedures involved in propagating horticultural plants: Asexual Propagation, Sexual Propagation, Physical Conditions, and Micropropagation. This is a well organized site with a lot of information, but you will need an Acrobat Reader to access the PDF files. This is part of the larger "Plant Dictionary" website by the Department of Horticulture & Crop Science at The Ohio State University. (****) -SR
February 17, 1999 - SciEd: Science and Mathematics Education Resources
This site includes pages on science in the news, a question and answer section, information on doing science, ethics, skepticism and pseudoscience, a reference shelf, suppliers of equipment and software, science education organization and other science links. There are also topical sites on the following subjects: Astronomy & Space Science, Physics, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Biological Sciences, Mathematics, Multiple Disciplines, Paleontology, Anthropology/Archeology, Science Museums & Exhibits and the History of Science. Among the Biological Sciences: General Biology Topics, Cellular/Microbiology, Oceanography/Marine Biology, EnviroEd: Environmental Science, Software, Biotechnology and Health Education. These sites have class activities and resources. This should be useful to everyone!!! Site by Alan Cairns through the HPCC/ESS Project at the University of Washington. (****) -SR
February 16, 1999 - Molecular Expressions: Mitosis
This one page site is a great introduction for mitosis--and especially plant mitosis since it uses onion root tips. Photomicrographs are alternated with accurate descriptions of mitosis. Site by Michael W. Davidson in the "Molecular Expressions Photo Gallery" at Florida State University. (****) -SR
February 15, 1999 - Taxonomy of Landscape Plants
This site features nomenclature, identification, and description of ornamental landscape plants, with links to online nursery catalogs, arboreta, universities, botanical gardens, plant societies, online genus/family keys, comprehensive keys, nomenclature, phytography (including phylometrics & florimetrics), online taxonomic literature and taxonomic techniques. The NOO (New Ornamentals Online) web-based encyclopedia of new and rare plants seems like a database looking for a good search engine. Site by Laurence C. Hatch, sponsored by Taxonomic Computer Research, New Ornamentals Society. (****) -SR
February 12, 1999 - Microscopy: The Tree Collection
Wood sections of 38 trees are shown at this site in cross section and two longitudinal views: radial (passing through the center, parallel to the rays) and tangential (at right angles to the rays). The microscopy is surprisingly mediocre; they must have little experience with wood. The vertical system of tracheids and vessels are shown horizontally (!?!) and the figures are fuzzy enough that diagnostic features are obscured -- still better than nothing. The accompanying descriptions are much better. Site in the "Molecular Expressions Photo Gallery" at Florida State University. (**1/2) -SR
February 11, 1999 - Costa Rican Rain Forest Ecology Field Trip
This is a course site for "BSC 306.08 - Costa Rican Rain Forest Ecology," J. E. Armstrong and S. Juliano, Instructors. At the site are some nice photos of the tropical rainforest from past trips, with captions. Hopefully, some sites like this could be expanded...! (***) -SR
February 10, 1999 - The Tallest, Biggest and Oldest Trees
This web page presents a pictorial field trip from the Pacific coast of California to the Great Basin in search of the biggest, tallest, oldest trees. The slide show features conveniently linked images of medium size (25-75KB JPGs), with descriptions explaining rain shadows and how to use these slides in teaching. Although the photographs vary in quality, they are often breathtaking and well worth looking at. The slides are (c) 1979 by David W. Lee, Florida International University, through Joe Armstrong at Illinois State University. (***1/2) -SR
February 9, 1999 - Joe Armstrong's Course Sites
This is a teaching site for Economic Botany (BSC 211) with pictorial essays on rubber, Cassava, paper, and coir (coconut fiber), Plant Diversity (BSC 222), Plant Taxonomy and Plant Identification (BSC 335 & 336), Mycology (BSC 334), and a Costa Rican Rainforest Ecology Field Trip (BSC 306.08). The thumbnail photos with captions are linked to large format (200KB to 500KB full size) JPG photos -- big, but fortunately on a fast server. A worthwhile photographically-oriented site by Joe Armstrong, Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL. (****) -SR
February 8, 1999 - Plants and Our Environment
Plants and Our Environment is a site developed as part of the ThinkQuest Junior competition. Topics include: "What is a flower, spreading seeds, Monocots and Dicots, how plants grow, germination, photosynthesis, our environment, and plant activities." There is also a hyperlinked glossary, bibliography and guestbook. Although there are some mistakes, the site is still worth recognizing. The site was constructed by fourth graders in Mrs. Ryan's class at Hinkle Creek Elementary School, Noblesville, Indiana. (***) -SR
February 5, 1999 - Phytoremediation: Biological remediation of environmental problems using plants
This is principally a research link site, with information on conferences, research sponsors, books, and links to other sites on phytoremediation. The US Environmental Protection Agency is increasingly recognizing that plants can be used to metabolize or detoxify man's waste materials at a fraction of the cost of many chemical methods. Site by John Cross at the Universities Space Research Association web site. (***1/2) -SR
February 4, 1999 - The Charms of Duckweed
This is a great, to-the-point web site on duckweeds - the smallest of the flowering plants - in the less than 0.5 cm range! Photos, a key to the duckweeds, a teaching guide, growing duckweeds, using duckweeds for space research, classroom research and bioremediation are all featured. If you like duckweeds, you will love this site, with lots of relevant links to other duckweed sites. Site by John W. Cross at the Universities Space Research Association web site. (***1/2) -SR
February 3, 1999 - Species 2000 - Indexing the world's known species
The Species 2000 project aims to enumerate "all known species of plants, animals, fungi and microbes on Earth as the baseline dataset for studies of global biodiversity." Though parts are still incomplete, current databases are available for bacteria, legumes, plant fossils, corals, and fishes. These may be searched by scientific name or higher groups. The site provides common names, number of subspecies, geographical records, habitats, descriptors, uses, literature references, and/or other fields. Site hosted by American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). (***1/2) - SR
February 2, 1999 - Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna
This site has pages on Arctic conservation, including conservation of habitats, species and biodiversity promoting an integration of indigenous people and their knowledge. The organization includes working groups on plants and animals and is part of the Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy (AEPS), supported by Canada, Denmark/Greenland, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the United States. Site by Gregg Legare and Lars Kullerud in consultation with Jeanne Pagnan at CAFF. (***1/2) -SR
February 1, 1999 - Why Study Plants?
This one page site gives lots of reasons to study plants: oxygen, ozone, food, fiber, wood & paper, fossil fuels, medicines, latex, pitch & resins, essential oils, decoration, and jobs. This is a great page by Ross Koning, Biology Department, Eastern Connecticut State University, Willimantic, CT. (****) -SR
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Past, past links (by date):

2006: January, February
2005: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2003: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2002: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2001: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2000: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
1999: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
1998: January*, February*, March*, April*, May*, June*, July, August, September, October, November, December   (*Leigh's links)
1997: January, February, March, April, May, June, September*, October*, November*, December*    (*Leigh's links)
1996: February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
Or search by: Subject Index

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