Scott's Botanical Links--January 2001

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Past links:

January 31, 2001 - Biology4Kids: Cells
This is an attractive high school-level description of the organization of cells, featuring the organelles of both plant and animal organelles. The drawings are purposefully colored in child-like crayon styles, but the overall organization and information is scientifically accurate. Although the site is clearly aimed at children, the site still may be useful for non-major's introduction to biology. Site by Andrew Rader Studios' Kapili Research Labs. (***1/2) -SR
January 30, 2001 - Leptosporangiate Ferns
Leptosporangiate ferns (Pteridopsida)--the common ferns--are the most diverse of the non-seed-producing plants, with about 12,000 species. Several versions of their systematics and relationships are presented here, along with a fairly complete introduction to their life history and biology. This single page site concludes with a current view of the placement of Filicopsida among the plants and excellent research references. The site is useful at all levels up to graduate study. This fern site by Kathleen M. Pryer and Alan R. Smith is part of the University of Arizona phylogeny project. (****) -SR
January 29, 2001 - Azolla in the Biology Lab: A Good Source of Prokaryotic Cyanobacteria
This site is a great little introduction to the biology of Azolla, one of the most advanced of the ferns and one of the most economically important, as it harbors a cyanobacterial colony that is capable of capturing atmospheric nitrogen for higher plants. Often grown with rice, the cyanobacter Anabaena increases the fertility of the paddies at little or no cost. In addition to harboring such a worthwhile symbiont, Azolla is a fascinating diminutive fern that is heterosporous, has unique male and female sporocarps and is dioecious with a complicated life cycle. This short write-up is one of the best on Azolla -- part of a weekly column at "Wayne's Word" (not world). The actual title is "A Marriage Between A Fern And A Cyanobacterium." Site by Wayne Armstrong. (****) -SR
January 26, 2001 - Fossil Plants At Buffalo Canyon, Nevada
This site provides a virtual tour of a 15-million-year-old fossil locality in Churchill County, Nevada--a site that has yielded ~54 species of ancient plants from the Middle Miocene Buffalo Canyon Formation. Combining narrative and images, the viewer gains a valuable impression of collecting trips and what to expect (all except for the many rocks left behind). This site also links to other collecting sites by the same author, courtesy of Bob's Rock Shop (a great rock webzine at http://www.rockhounds.com/rockshop/table.html), which published some of this material first. (***1/2) -SR
January 25, 2001 - The Ethnobotanical Experience
This site is a very nice introduction to the medicinal side of ethnobotany by final year student at the University of Plymouth, UK. Topics range from rain forest diversity, to how pharmaceutically interesting drugs are isolated from plants. The "Fifty drugs derived from medicinal plants" include easily recognizable chemicals, their plant of origin and clinical significance. This is a nice place to start, complete with references. Site by Katie Spicer, Plymouth, UK. (***1/2) -SR
January 24, 2001 - Wildflowers of the Southeastern United States
This information and image-rich wildflower site started as a simple database and now features high quality images with detailed text for each species (listed by common and scientific name). The search function allows browsing by flower color as well as species name. Plant habit, leaves, flower, habitat, range, systematic classification, medicinal uses, and similar plants are listed, along with links to species sites at USDA Plants, ITIS Taxa and USDA Plants. An encyclopedic site on Southeastern flowers by Daniel Reed. (****)
January 23, 2001 - Plants of the Northwoods
Plant images and information are provided in checklist form on this Northwoods natural history site (part of a larger site at http://www.rook.org/earl/bwca/ based on excursions into the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, northern Minnesota and southern Ontario). Not all of the plants at this flora site have links or images, but those that do have extensive descriptions of each plant, which include trees, shrubs, herbs, fern allies, mosses, lichens and liverworts. An impressive and extensive non-commercial effort that should be useful as a natural history guide of the Web. Site by Earl R.S. Rook. (***1/2) -SR
January 22, 2001 - Ferns from the Vercors (France)
This site features striking images and narrative about the ferns found in Vercors area, located in the foothills east of the French Alps near Grenoble. Separate pages provide indices of ferns found in woods and forests, rocky areas and open areas of the Vercors. Distinguishing this site is the high quality of photography, which seems to capture both botany and emotion. Many of these ferns are common to the Northern Hemisphere. The site is also available in French. (***1/2) -SR
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Past, past links (by date):

2006: January, February
2005: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2003: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2002: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2001: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
2000: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
1999: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
1998: January*, February*, March*, April*, May*, June*, July, August, September, October, November, December   (*Leigh's links)
1997: January, February, March, April, May, June, September*, October*, November*, December*    (*Leigh's links)
1996: February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December
Or search by: Subject Index

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http://new.botlinx.org/jan01.shtml